The COVID-19 pandemic has battered the entire world over the last two years, with no clear end yet in sight, though some populations and some locales have fared better than others. This public health disaster has thrown into stark focus many shortcomings in health care policy and delivery across the world, and has raised profound ethical concerns at international, national, state, community, and personal levels. Bioethics has been called to apply its conceptual approaches and deliberative tools to help shape policies and assist decisions with life-and-death consequences "in the time of covid".

Learning Objectives

  1. Review basic foundations and theories of bioethics
  2. Review applications of bioethics to epidemics and disasters
  3. Assess events in the COVID-19 pandemic through the bioethics lens
  4. Identify needed changes to better prepare for the "next pandemic"

Duration: Approx. 1 hr 30 min.

Continuing Education Information:  1.5 Continuing Competency Credits for CHES, 1.5 CPEUs for Registered Dietitians

CHES Provider number:  99036; CPEU Provider number: 21216

Format:  Recorded Webinar

Created/Updated: Recorded 11/5/2021

Author: Linda Axtell-Thompson, DBE, MBA

Disclosures:  The planners, reviewers, and authors have no declared conflicts of interest 

Skill Level: Advanced
CHES Event ID#: PM99036_11052021
Category 1 Credits: 1.5
Activity #: 166252
Performance Indicators: 1.3.1, 1.3.2, 1.3.3, 4.2.1
RD Total Credits: 1.5
Level 1: No
Level 2: Yes
Level 3: No

This interactive training looks at the most fundamental aspects of public health to break down the overarching goals and strategies of the field. You'll gain an understanding of the Three Public Health Core Functions and the Ten Essential Public Health Services* as a framework for the responsibilities of local public health systems, and how this framework serves to improve health equity.

*This training has been updated to align with the revised version of Essential Public Health Services. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Define public health. 
  2. List the social determinants of health. 
  3. Recognize the three Public Health Core Functions. 
  4. Identify ways each of the Essential Public Health Services works to improve health equity.
  5. Identify the role your work plays in public health.

Target Audience: Educators/Trainers, General Public Health Staff

Tier(s) and Competency Domain(s): Tier 1 - Communication Skills, Cultural Competency Skills and Community Dimensions of Practice Skills; Tier 2 - Cultural Competency Skills and Community Dimensions of Practice Skills.

Course Duration: ~60 minutes

Continuing Education Information: 1.0 Continuing Competency credit for CHES; 1.0 credit for Registered Dietitians

CHES Provider number:  99036; CPEU Provider number: 21216

Format: Self-Study

Created/Updated: July 30, 2021

Author(s): Ray Andrade, Ed.D; Sana Khan, MPH; Abby Stoica, MPH

Arranged by: Dipanwita Das

Disclosures:  The planners, reviewers, and authors have no declared conflicts of interest

PHLN Certified Quality Seal

Skill Level: Beginner
CHES Event ID#: SS99036_PHEA
Category 1 Credits: 1.0
Continuing Competency Credits: 1.0
Advanced Credits: 0
Activity #: 165730
Performance Indicators: 12.2.1, 12.2.3, 12.3.3
RD Total Credits: 1.0
Level 1: No
Level 2: Yes
Level 3: No

This training introduces the public health competencies that were designed by the Council on Linkages and customized by the Pima County Health Department. Specifically, this training acquaints you with the competencies so you can begin to use them for career development.

Learning Objective

At the end of this training, you will be able to identify the domains associated with the public health competencies.

Continuing Education:  1.0 CECH for CHES

Skill Level: Beginner
CHES Event ID#: SS99036_PHCC
Category 1 Credits: 1.0
Continuing Competency Credits: 0
Advanced Credits: 0
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No

This toolkit is designed to introduce new and existing local board of health (LBOH) members to the nature of public health practice, and what role they can play in improving their community's health - even without a LHD. As one of these systems, it was determined that officials in Nevada could benefit from having access to training resources that are relevant to their local public health system, and thus has provided the context for the examples provided here. This series of short videos will introduce LBOH members to various topics, and then suggest additional resources they may access for more information. The topics covered here include: 

  • The Six Functions of Governance from the National Association of Local Boards of Health
  • Types of statewide public health systems
  • Types of organizations that might be included in local public health systems
  • Nevada Revised Statute as it pertains to rural and frontier LBOHs
  • Community health needs assessments
  • Community health improvement planning
  • Strategic planning
  • Quality improvement

This training consists of nine training modules/assessments and one feedback evaluation. 


Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the basic purpose and responsibilities of local boards of health (LBOH), including those who do not oversee a local health department
  • Understand the types and differences among statewide public health systems
  • Understand the broad range of activities in which LBOH members may engage to improve community health
  • Apply knowledge to engage all appropriate stakeholders in public health initiatives 

Target Audience:  Public Health Professionals

Tiers and Competency Domains:  Tier 1- Community Dimensions of Practice Skills, Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills; Tier 2- Community Dimensions of Practice; Tier 3- Community Dimensions of Practice Skills

Duration:  Approx 1.5 hrs

Continuing Education Information:  None available

Format: Web-based Training, Self-Study

Created/ Updated: 7/2018

Authors:  Valerie Cauhape, MA, MPH, Kelly Morning, MPH

Presenter: Valerie Cauhape, MA, MPH

Skill Level: Beginner
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No

The goal of this module is to provide an understanding of the purpose and structure of the student ambassador program at the University of Arizona and the leadership responsibilities student ambassadors have to stop the spread of COVID-19.


At the end of this module, the learner will be able to:

  1. Describe the purpose of a student ambassador model.
  2. Apply inclusive communication techniques to educate peers about COVID-19 prevention practices.
  3. Understand strategies to utilize and share accurate information on social media with peers to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.
  4. Illustrate the leadership role student ambassadors will fulfill within the UArizona community to stop the spread of COVID-19.

Skill Level: Beginner
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No

COVID-19 has dramatically changed the delivery of healthcare. Providers and patients have experienced in a very short amount of time some of the greatest changes to the healthcare system ever seen. Those who were reluctant to embrace telehealth prior to COVID found themselves obliged to implement it often just to stay in business. The rapid utilization of telemedicine was enabled by equally rapid changes in regulations and waivers for billing. This talk will summarize where we might be going with telemedicine post-COVID, especially in the public health arena. In particular, the focus will be on how to transition from a rapidly implemented program using readily available platforms to more sustainable long-term use of telemedicine integrated in usual practice. Resources available to help with this transition will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the key aspects of the status of COVID-related telehealth regulations and waivers.
  • Appreciate the broader role of mHealth, apps, sensors, and remote monitoring post COVID.
  • Learn about ways to transition the use of telehealth into traditional practice models
  • Know where to look for resources and technical assistance with telemedicine questions.

Target Audience:  Public Health Professionals

Tiers and Competency Domains:  Tiers 1, 2, 3; Community Dimensions of Practice, Leadership and Systems Thinking

Duration: ~ 35 minutes

Continuing Education Information:  0.5 CECH for CHES

Format: Web-based Training, Self-Study

Created/ Updated: 8/2020

Presenter: Elizabeth A. Krupinski, PhD

Dr. Krupinski is Professor and Vice-Chair for Research at Emory University in the Department of Radiology & Imaging Sciences and subject matter expert for the Emory Telehealth Program. She received her BA from Cornell, MA from Montclair State, and Ph.D. from Temple, all in Experimental Psychology. Her interests are in medical image perception, observer performance, decision making, and human factors. She is the Associate Director of Evaluation for the Arizona Telemedicine Program and co-Director of the Southwest Telehealth Resource Center. She is Past President of ATA, Past Chair of Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine, Past Chair of the SPIE Medical Imaging Conference, and President of the Medical Image Perception Society. She is Co-Editor of the Journal of Telemedicine & Telecare and on the Editorial Board of the Telemedicine & E-Health Journal.

Skill Level: Beginner
CHES Event ID#: SS99036_FTPH
Category 1 Credits: 0.5
Continuing Competency Credits: 0
Advanced Credits: 0
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No

This presentation will provide insights on the need for the continual evolution of public health practices in light of COVID-19 and the current social movements that highlight how social determinants effect health disparities.  A focus on what trainings are needed to strengthen the current and future public health workforce will be discussed to respond to the necessity that public health services must be redefined and redesigned.  Examples of current and novel steps that are starting to be taken by health departments and public health education programs to meet this challenge will be presented.  We will conclude our presentation by proposing what new knowledge and skills are needed by the public health workforce so our current communal approach to infectious disease prevention can be leveraged to reduce a variety of health disparities including maternal and child health, and chronic disease outcomes. 

Learning Objectives

  • Evaluate how COVID-19 has further amplified the relationship between public health efforts and social determinants undermine health. 

  • Identify new areas of knowledge and skills that are needed within an expanded definition of the public health workforce. 

  • Discuss what is needed to create a more diverse, community-centric public health workforce. 

Target Audience:  Public Health Professionals

Tiers and Competency Domains:  Tiers 2 and 3; Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills

Duration:  ~ 35 minutes

Continuing Education Information:  0.5 CECH for CHES

Format: Web-based Training, Self-Study

Created/ Updated: 8/2020

Presenters: Douglas Taren, Ph.D., MS; and Betty Bekemeier, Ph.D., MPH, RN, FAAN

Douglas Taren is a Professor of Public Health at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. He has more than 30 years of experience conducting research and training students in international health. His research and teaching activities have included projects in Panama, Costa Rica, Mexico, China, Nepal, Kenya, Senegal, and the US Associated Pacific Islands, and more.Dr. Taren currently directs the Western Region Public Health Training Center (WRPHTC)for HRSA Region 9 (Arizona, Nevada, California, Hawaii, and the US Affiliated Pacific Islands). The WRPHTC works to strengthen the public health workforce through interactive, skill-based training.

Betty Bekemeier is a professor at the University of Washington (UW) School of Nursing and Director of the UW School of Public Health’s Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. She is a distinguished public health systems researcher focused on improving the effectiveness of our prevention systems and related workforce. She has led numerous studies regarding local health department services and their impact on health outcomes and equity. She emphasizes the inclusion of rural public health jurisdictions to generate evidence that will improve the reach and distribution of services to underserved communities and meet the needs of the rural workforce. Dr. Bekemeier is also PI of the Public Health Activities and Services Tracking (PHAST) Study, initiated in 2010 through the RWJF. PHAST is a highly regarded, growing database of uniquely detailed and linked data regarding LHD services and financing, including the PHAST Uniform Chart of Accounts which is helping local health departments have better access to meaningful financial data for decision-making. Dr. Bekemeier’s projects and studies are carried out in close partnership with public health practice leaders and have been immediately relevant to addressing current policy issues. She has also held many leadership positions, including those in the Washington State Public Health Association, the American Public Health Association, NACCHO’s Profile Workgroup.

Skill Level: Beginner
CHES Event ID#: SS99036_PCWF
Category 1 Credits: 0.5
Continuing Competency Credits: 0
Advanced Credits: 0
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No

During the COVID-19 pandemic, public health professionals across the U.S. and globally have used video conference technology to exchange vital information, build knowledge, provide peer support, and work collaboratively. As we transition into recovery, we have an opportunity to leverage these shifts in the way public health professionals work and learn together to create more permanent systems for connecting professionals and developing workforce capacity. In this session, we will explore two learning/capacity building models that are based in human connection, mutual interest, and adult learning theory that build long-lasting public health capacity. Specifically, we will focus on communities of practice (aka learning communities, learning collaboratives, peer networks, etc.) and Project ECHO. ®  

Learning Objectives

  • Name the characteristics of communities of practice and Project ECHO that make them well-suited for emergency response and recovery.  

  • Identify the principles of communities of practice and Project ECHO that support adult learning. 

  • Identify the core elements of launching and managing successful communities of practice, including participant engagement and facilitation.  

  • Access resources for more guidance on communities of practice, Project ECHO, Connected Learning, and similar models.  

Target Audience:  Public Health Professionals

Tiers and Competency Domains:  Tiers 2 and 3; Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills, Communications Skills

Duration:  ~ 40 minutes

Continuing Education Information: 0.5 CECH for CHES

Format: Web-based Training, Self-Study

Created/ Updated: 8/2020

Presenter: Jennifer McKeever, MSW, MPH

Jennifer McKeever is an independent consultant with over 15 years of experience turning big ideas into actionable programs. She specializes in creating teams, systems, and processes to successfully implement large public health initiatives. Jennifer is well-known for her ability to design, convene, and facilitate meaningful conversations and learning events. Most recently, Jennifer led the creation of NNPHI’s National Coordinating Center for Public Health Training (NCCPHT), guiding the organization's investment in the public health workforce. Through innovative learning technologies and proven approaches grounded in adult learning theory, NCCPHT serves all public health professionals by expanding access to high-quality training, tools, and resources they need to effectively respond to complex public health issues. She also created thewww.phlearningnavigator.org and NNPHI's Project ECHO network. Jennifer’s work is driven by the belief that the workforce is public health’s most valuable asset, and we should demonstrate that value through funding and quality workforce development.

Skill Level: Beginner
CHES Event ID#: SS99036_MCHDCSD
Category 1 Credits: 0.5
Continuing Competency Credits: 0
Advanced Credits: 0
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No

The future of the public health field is uncertain, and that will continue to be true. Workforce development will play a critical role in preparing in an uncertain and constantly evolving environment. Cuts to budget health and turnover are likely to continue. It’s more important than ever that staff have strategic skills, many of which were identified several years ago by the National Consortium for Workforce Development. In particular, skills in change management and persuasive communication have grown in importance. The de Beaumont Foundation is partnering with other public health leaders and practitioners to develop several tools to equip the workforce, including a project to identify the appropriate ratio of public health staff for communities and new tools for effective communication with community partners the public. Health agencies should carefully consider how they’re using their training dollars to ensure that they are building resilient and sustainable skills.

Learning Objectives

  • Gain insights about the current and future needs of the public health workforce.
  • Learn which strategic skills are particularly valuable in an environment where change is the norm.
  • Get access to practical tools that can help build skills.

Target Audience:  Public Health Professionals

Tiers and Competency Domains:  Tiers 2 and 3; Communications Skills, Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills

Duration:  ~ 30 minutes

Continuing Education Information:  0.5 CECH for CHES

Format: Web-based Training, Self-Study

Created/ Updated: 8/2020

Presenter: Brian Castrucci

Brian Castrucci is a disruptor, instigator, and fierce advocate for public health. Inside Philanthropy once described him as a “fount of knowledge and passion when it comes to health” who speaks with “sound-bite-perfect urgency” on the social determinants of health. Over the past eight years, Brian has helped build the de Beaumont Foundation into a national powerhouse in public health philanthropy and advocacy. He now serves as the Foundation’s Chief Executive Officer. An award-winning epidemiologist with 10 years of experience in state and local health departments, Brian brings a unique background that allows him to shape and implement visionary and practical initiatives and partnerships that bring together research and practice to improve public health. Under his leadership, the de Beaumont Foundation is driving change to improve population health, foster collaboration between public health and other sectors, and strengthen the nation’s public health infrastructure. CityHealth, the BUILD Health Challenge, and the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey are among the national projects he has helped create while at the Foundation.

Skill Level: Beginner
CHES Event ID#: SS99036_SSWPG
Category 1 Credits: 0.5
Continuing Competency Credits: 0
Advanced Credits: 0
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No

This course introduces health disparities facing rural America and some of the determinants of health that factor into the health status of rural communities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Inform about prevalent health issues rural residents face
  • Discuss determinants/barriers that factor into rural communities' poor health
  • Present current and potential implementations to improve rural health

Target Audience: Community Health Workers

Duration: 30 minutes

Format: web based/self study

Created/updated: 12/18/2017

Author: Maxine Chang

Skill Level: Beginner
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No