In this presentation, Renae Badruzzaman will describe place-based interventions that bring in community development as a key partner to address social determinants of health; explore moving further upstream to systemic, institutional, and structural change; and demonstrate how the public health workforce can adapt to address systemic racism and health inequities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe place-based interventions that bring in community development as a key partner to address social determinants of health.
  • Explore moving further upstream to systemic, institutional, and structural change. 
  • Demonstrate how the public health workforce can adapt to address systemic racism and health inequities.
Target Audience:  Public Health Professionals 

Duration:  ~ 26 minutes

Continuing Education Information:  0.5 CECH for CHES

Disclosures:  There are no conflicts of interest to report.

Format:  Web-based Training, Self-Study

Created/Updated:  08/2020

Author(s)/ Presenter(s):  Renae A. Badruzzaman, MPH

Renae Badruzzaman is Program Manager at Build Healthy Places Network where she operationalizes and implements the Network’s place-based strategy. Renae brings a decade of experience working in multidisciplinary and cross-sector collaborations to advance health equity, inclusion, and justice for people of color and communities with low-income. Prior to joining the Network, Renae served as the Program Manager for Health Equity Investments at the Bay Area Regional Health Inequities Initiative. She played a key role in the strategic development and policy advocacy of an anchor mission strategy for local public health departments. While in Chicago, Renae directed a center that promoted a socially just and self-determined system of long-term services and supports and managed a federally-funded leadership program focused on children with special health care needs. She received an MPH from the University of Illinois at Chicago in Community Health Sciences and a BA in Psychology.

Skill Level: Beginner
CHES Event ID#: SS99036_ASR
Category 1 Credits: 0.5
Continuing Competency Credits: 0
Advanced Credits: 0
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No

This presentation addresses the persistent crisis of homelessness in U.S. cities and presents recent research from Los Angeles that demonstrates how the economic and social devastation wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic will greatly worsen the crisis of housing insecurity. The crisis of homelessness, as well as that of impending evictions, are disproportionately borne by Black, Brown, and Indigenous communities, making these matters of racial inequality. While public health experts have drawn attention to the dangers of congregate shelters and the need for emergency non-congregate sheltering, what is urgently needed are new visions and models of housing provision. Adopting a Housing First approach, Professor Roy will make a case for how access to housing can be rapidly and significantly expanded, and the principles of racial and housing justice that must undergird such efforts.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the economic and social impact of COVID-19 on housing insecurity, particularly the disparities faced by Black, Latinx, and Indigenous communities.
  • Describe the Housing First approach.
  • Identify strategies to expand access to housing in the context of racial and housing justice.

Target Audience: Public Health Professionals 

Duration: 34 minutes

Continuing Education Information:  0.5 CECH for CHES

Format: Web-based training, Self Study

Originally Recorded: 08/2020

Presenter: Ananya Roy, Professor of Urban Planning, Social Welfare, and Geography and The Meyer and Renee Luskin Chair in Inequality and Democracy at the University of California, Los Angeles.


Ananya Roy is a Professor of Urban Planning, Social Welfare, and Geography and The Meyer and Renee Luskin Chair in Inequality and Democracy at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the inaugural Director of the UCLA LuskinInstituteonInequalityandDemocracyatUCLA, which advances research and scholarship concerned with displacement and dispossession in Los Angeles and elsewhere in the world. Working in alliance with social movements, the Institute seeks to build power and abolish structures of inequality. Ananya’s work has a determined focus on poverty and inequality with special emphasis on housing insecurity and urban displacement. Her most recent book is Encountering Poverty: Thinking and Acting in an Unequal World(University of California Press, 2016), which was accompanied by the #GlobalPOV video series. Currently, she leads a National Science Foundation Research Coordination Network on Housing Justice in Unequal Cities.

Skill Level: Beginner
CHES Event ID#: SS99036_AOP2122020
Category 1 Credits: 0.5
Continuing Competency Credits: 0
Advanced Credits: 0
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No

We are seeing dramatic inequities in COVID-19 impacts, with people of color being severely and disproportionately affected. The virus has starkly laid bare racial inequities facing this nation which are deeply rooted in structural racism and historic disinvestment. The tragic and unjust deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery have catalyzed a broader awareness and awakening of what many of us in the public health field already knew: racism is a public health crisis. How can these confluent, historic events advance equity during the COVID-19 response and beyond? Join this session to explore real-time learnings and opportunities for Public Health practice to advance equity in this unprecedented moment.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify key data indicators to support an equitable COVID-19 response and recovery.
  • Describe public health practices that positioned local health departments to successfully engage with communities most impacted by disproportionate COVID-19 outcomes.
  • Identify at least 3 strategies to elevate and begin to address racism as a public health crisis

Target Audience: Public Health Professionals 

Duration: 26 minutes

Continuing Education Information: 0.5 CECH for CHES 

Format: Web-based training, Self Study

Originally Recorded: 08/2020

Presenter: Tracy Delaney, PhD

Tracy Delaney is the founding director of the Public Health Alliance of Southern California (Alliance) -a regional coalition of eight local health departments whose members have statutory responsibility for the health of 50% of California’s population. Her work advances equity and population health through multi-sector initiatives addressing policy, systems, and environmental change. She has spearheaded multidisciplinary projects integrating land use and transportation, food systems, climate and water resources, and public health and hospital systems. Under Dr. Delaney’s direction, the Alliance has developed the California Healthy Places Index, a positively framed community condition tool that is associated with life expectancy at birth at granular geographies. During her previous tenure at the County of San Diego, she was Principal Investigator for Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) Communities Putting Prevention to Work grant, the nation’s largest federal obesity prevention award, and the CDC’s Community Transformation Grant. She holds a doctorate in Nutrition from the University of California, Davis. Dr. Delaney was honored with the Leadership Award by the Southern California Public Health Association.

Skill Level: Beginner
CHES Event ID#: PM99036_10112019
Category 1 Credits: 0.5
Continuing Competency Credits: 0
Advanced Credits: 0
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No

Public health professionals have warned that the COVID-19 Pandemic and the accompanying financial strains of a recession will require an agile response. COVID-19 response and recovery are occurring simultaneously. This session will apply a racial equity lens to pandemic response and share a model from the San Francisco Bay Area focused on COVID-19 responses focused on the Social Determinants of Health. Some have referred to COVID-19 as the great equalizer because viruses don’t discriminate. But while viruses don’t discriminate, people and policies can and do. The cost of this outbreak has been disproportionately borne by communities of color. Black and brown workers make up the majority of essential personnel and are more likely to be locked into expensive, unstable housing thanks to exclusionary rental and lending practices. This has left a significant percentage of the country unable to shelter in place, forced to continue working and risking infection and transmission. We will discuss what rolling recovery means for these workers--and how policies and systems can create protection factors for their health.

Learning Objectives

  • Examine the BARHII Regional Response and Rolling Recovery Plan, which combines public health equity infrastructure and policies to protect the social determinants of health
  • Discuss the Bay Area model of regional response, which focuses on building momentum with early wins and targeted investment in communities with less infrastructure
  • Identify strategies to be led by communities most impacted throughout the rolling pandemic

Duration: 18 minutes

Continuing Education Information: 0.5 CECH for CHES

Format: Web-based training, Self Study

Originally Recorded: 08/2020

Presenter: Melissa Jones, MPA

Melissa Jones is the Executive Director of the Bay Area Regional Health Inequities Initiative (BARHII). She is passionate about creating conditions that increase the quality of life and makes life fairer for more people. Her work focuses on the intersection of social determinants of health, social inequity, and well-being. Her experience includes work in municipal government and non-profits in the Bay Area’s large and small cities. Melissa is an active community member in Oakland and also serves on the Association of Bay Area Government’s Regional Planning Committee, which advices on regional planning issues. Before joining BARHII, Melissa served as Senior Program Officer at Boston Local Initiative Support Corporation (LISC), where she launched and ran Boston LISC’s Resilient Communities Resilient Families (RCRF) Initiative. Melissa has additional experience funding and implementing programs focused on community economic development, family financial stability, education, and civic empowerment. Specifically, she has served in youth empowerment organizations, as Program Specialist for the City of Alameda, and as Program Analyst for the City of Oakland’s Oakland Fund for Children and Youth. Early in her career, she served as Director of Professional Development for Partners in School Innovation, where she trained staff to support school reform efforts in SanFrancisco Unified, San Jose Unified, and Oak Grove Unified school districts.


Skill Level: Beginner
CHES Event ID#: SS99036_CRRR
Category 1 Credits: 0.5
Continuing Competency Credits: 0
Advanced Credits: 0
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No

Homelessness is a public health crisis fueled by racial inequities and society's policy choices. The conditions under which people experiencing homelessness (PEH) live place them at increased risk of exposure to the novel coronavirus. They are also more likely to develop COVID once exposed, and less likely to receive care and have conditions that will enable them to recover. We will review some of the data on PEH's health status, measures taken by providers to protect the health of PEH during the COVID pandemic, recommendations made by CDC and HUD, and partnerships that were formed among health and shelter service providers in the pandemic. We will also explore some of the limited data about COVID and PEH and public health measures that should be taken to protect the health of PEH and to end homelessness.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand homelessness in the broader societal framework and the risk factors affecting health status faced by people experiencing homelessness (PEH)
  • Understand some responses to the COVID pandemic by Health Care for the Homeless Programs, Medical Respite programs, local health departments, CDC and HUD
  • Evaluate what short- and long-term steps need to be taken to protect the health of PEH as a means to end homelessness.

Duration: 32 minutes

Continuing Education Information:  0.5 CECH for CHES

Format: Web-based training, Self Study

Originally Recorded: 08/2020

Presenter: G. Robert (“Bobby”) Watts, MPH, MS, CPH

Bobby Watts is the Chief Executive Officer of the National Health Care for the Homeless Council, which supports the 300 federally-supportedHealth Care for the Homeless programsand90 Medical Respite providers with training, technical assistance, sharing of best practices, research, publications, and an active policy and advocacy program working to eliminate homelessness. A nationally recognized advocate and leader in meeting the health needs of people without homes, Bobby has 30 years of experience in administration, direct service, and implementation of homeless health services, beginning as a live-in counselor at the NYC Rescue Mission. He spent most of his career before joining the Council at Care for the Homeless, which operates clinics, shelters, and conducts policy analysis and advocacy in NYC, beginning as an intern and serving as the Executive Director for twelve years. He has served on numerous boards and government-appointed task forces and councils. He is a graduate of Cornell University and the Columbia University Mailman School of PublicHealth from which he holds a Master’s in Public Health in health administration and a Master's Science in epidemiology. He also earned a Certificate of Theological Studies from Alliance Theological Seminary in Nyack, NY.

Skill Level: Beginner
CHES Event ID#: SS99036_PHPEH
Category 1 Credits: 0.5
Continuing Competency Credits: 0
Advanced Credits: 0
Level 1: No
Level 2: No
Level 3: No